alexismorrellcomedy:

Going to see “This Is Where I Leave You” tonight!!!! 

Can’t wait till October when this is out

couture-day:

Spring/Summer 2015 Jenny Packham

What do you actually do during a scene when you’re uncomfortable and what are ways to overcome it?

Liz Lemon and Michael Bluth in the same film, yippy!

memeguy-com:

As a plumber he should be used to making House calls

memeguy-com:

As a plumber he should be used to making House calls

r10ang:

anonymous

r10ang:

anonymous

665-the-neighbor-of-the-beast:

I always look at them like this.

665-the-neighbor-of-the-beast:

I always look at them like this.

itsheezy:

Photo

itsheezy:

Photo

"So, what made you wanna be a part of the Altman clan?" [x]

markruffalo:


Foxcatcher went into production outside Pittsburgh in September 2012—a full five years after Miller had once hoped cameras would roll—and filming continued well into the bleak and punishing winter. Miller arrived with a fourth writer, Kristin Gore, and three massive notebooks that he’d filled with every writer’s iteration of every sequence. Although the style of Foxcatcher is precise and restrained, he was eager to reshape scenes on the spot, often leading the cast through improvisatory exercises before the cameras rolled. “I guess it’s closer to what Mike Leigh does than to Aaron Sorkin,” he says of his approach. “I like going into a scene knowing that the script isn’t quite finished, that there’s something that isn’t really going to reveal itself until something spontaneously occurs.”

Love this piece on the making of Foxcatcher from Vulture. Read the whole article HERE.

markruffalo:

Foxcatcher went into production outside Pittsburgh in September 2012—a full five years after Miller had once hoped cameras would roll—and filming continued well into the bleak and punishing winter. Miller arrived with a fourth writer, Kristin Gore, and three massive notebooks that he’d filled with every writer’s iteration of every sequence. Although the style of Foxcatcher is precise and restrained, he was eager to reshape scenes on the spot, often leading the cast through improvisatory exercises before the cameras rolled. “I guess it’s closer to what Mike Leigh does than to Aaron Sorkin,” he says of his approach. “I like going into a scene knowing that the script isn’t quite finished, that there’s something that isn’t really going to reveal itself until something spontaneously occurs.”

Love this piece on the making of Foxcatcher from Vulture. Read the whole article HERE.

blog-girl-on-film:

Toronto Internation Film Festival’14 Portraits by Justin Bishop | Vanity Fair. Part II